America's Preparedness Report Card

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When it comes to preparing for extreme heat, inland flooding, and coastal flooding risks, New Jersey could be doing a lot more. Even though it has done a lot to address today's climate risks, it is falling behind when it comes to bracing for future threat levels; New Jersey does not yet have a statewide climate change adaptation plan in place.

Extreme Heat

New Jersey's heat wave days are projected to more than quadruple by 2050, and by then the state could face an average of 45 high risk days each year.  Although the state has taken some steps to evaluate its vulnerability to future extreme heat, it has not put any plans in place to address the growing risk.

Drought

Grades were assigned only when threats were identified as priorities for that state. For details, see the methodology.

Wildfires

Grades were assigned only when threats were identified as priorities for that state. For details, see the methodology.

Inland Flooding

More than 310,000 people are living in New Jersey's flood-prone areas. The state is working to understand its inland flooding vulnerabilities but still needs to develop plans and act to protect against future risk.

Coastal Flooding

New Jersey has the fourth-largest population at risk of coastal flooding but it lags behind other coastal states in taking steps to prepare for future sea level rise and coastal flooding risks. Like most coastal states, New Jersey has taken strong action to address its current risks, but it could do more to assess its vulnerability to climate change-driven coastal flooding, and much more to plan for increasing coastal flooding risks.