America's Preparedness Report Card

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Michigan has done more than the majority of states to prepare for the three climate threats extreme heat, drought, and inland flooding. In particular, the Department of Transportation has begun to assess its vulnerability to future climate change, and the Michigan Climate and Health Adaptation Program is helping to address climate change impacts to public health.

Extreme Heat

Michigan is projected to see a five-fold increase in heat wave days by 2050, and the state has already taken multiple steps to understand its future heat risks. In particular, its transportation and health sectors have set a strong standard. For example, the state agencies responsible for transportation and public health have both published statewide heat-related vulnerability assessments.

Drought

Michigan faces an above average overall summer drought threat, but it has matched this high threat level with an above average level of preparedness. In particular, Michigan has already begun to implement adaptation measures to improve its resilience to climate change-related drought.

Wildfires

Grades were assigned only when threats were identified as priorities for that state. For details, see the methodology.

Inland Flooding

Nearly 340,000 people live in Michigan's flood-prone areas. The state is taking strong measures to address its current risks but it could do more by focusing on improving its resilience to future changes in flooding risks.

Coastal Flooding

Grades were assigned only when threats were identified as priorities for that state. For details, see the methodology.