America's Preparedness Report Card

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Hawaii needs to do a lot more to increase its level of preparedness for current and future changes in extreme heat and coastal flooding risks. While it has taken a few limited steps towards integrating climate change projections into state planning, it lacks specific plans for adaptation. Even its measures for addressing its current risks fall short, and do not include responses for extreme heat.

Extreme Heat

Hawaii is failing to address its current and growing extreme heat threat. Even though its temperatures are generally moderated by the nearby ocean and onshore winds, days above 90°F are not uncommon, and humidity is typically high. The state needs to do more to prepare for its current risks and plan for hotter temperatures due to climate change.

Drought

Grades were assigned only when threats were identified as priorities for that state. For details, see the methodology.

Wildfires

Grades were assigned only when threats were identified as priorities for that state. For details, see the methodology.

Inland Flooding

Grades were assigned only when threats were identified as priorities for that state. For details, see the methodology.

Coastal Flooding

About 65,000 people in Hawaii live within the 100-year coastal floodplain; by 2050, the the state faces the greatest percentage increase in coastal flooding threat of any state. Even though the state has recognized the risk climate change poses for coastal flooding, it has not yet put adaptation plans in place.